Revisiting Html in Java

Posted by & filed under Java.

Some time ago I wrote a post about creating an embedded dsl for Html in Java. Sadly, it was based on an abuse of lambda name reflection that was later removed from Java. I thought I should do a followup because a lot of people still visit the old article. While it’s no longer possible… Read more »

Meetings, ugh! Let’s change our language

Posted by & filed under XP.

“How was your day?” “Ugh, I spent all day in meetings, didn’t get any work done!”  How often have you heard this exchange? It makes me sad because someone’s day has not been joyful; work can be fun.  I love a whinge as much as the next Brit; maybe if we said what we mean… Read more »

Latency Numbers Every Team Should Know

Posted by & filed under ContinuousDelivery, XP.

Meandering path towards value

Here’s some important feedback loops for a team, with feasible delays. I’d consider these delays tolerable by a team doing their best work (in contexts I’ve worked in). Some teams can do better, lots do worse.

Humility

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Extreme Programming describes five values: communication, feedback, simplicity, courage, and respect. I think that humility might be more important than all of these.  Humility enables compassion. Compassion both provides motivation for and maximises the return on technical practices. Humility pairs well with courage, helps us keep things simple, and makes feedback valuable. Humility enables Compassion … Read more »

Sealed Java State Machines

Posted by & filed under Java.

A few years back I posted about how to implement state machines that only permit valid transitions at compile time in Java. This used interfaces instead of enums, which had a big drawback—you can’t guarantee that you know all the states involved. Java 15 brings a preview feature of sealed classes, solving this downside.

A little rant about talent

Posted by & filed under XP.

It’s become less common to hear people referred to as “resources” in recent times. There’s more trendy “official vocab guidelines”, but what’s really changed? There’s still phrases in common use that sound good but betray the same mindset. I often hear people striving to “hire and retain the best talent“ as if that is a… Read more »

Fun with Java Records

Posted by & filed under Java.

A while back I promised to follow up from this tweet to elaborate on the fun I was having with Java’s new Records (currently preview) feature. Records, like lambdas and default methods on interfaces are tremendously useful language features because they enable many different patterns and uses beyond the obvious. Java 8 brought lambdas, with… Read more »

The benefits of making code worse

Posted by & filed under XP.

A recent twitter discussion reminded me of an interesting XTC discussion last year. The discussion topic was refactoring code to make it worse. We discussed why this happens, and what we can do about it. I found the most interesting discussion arose from the question “when might this be a good thing?”—when is it beneficial… Read more »

Reasons to hire inexperienced engineers

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There are many reasons to consider hiring inexperienced software engineers into your team, beyond the commonly discussed factors of cost and social responsibility. Hire to maximise team effectiveness; not to maximise team size. Adding more people increases the communication and synchronisation overhead in the team. Growing a team has rapidly diminishing returns. However, adding the… Read more »

Do you CI?

Posted by & filed under ContinuousDelivery, XP.

When I ask ask people about their approach to continuous integration, I often hear a response like “yes of course, we have CI, we use…”. When I ask people about doing continuous integration I often hear “that wouldn’t work for us…” It seems the practice of continuous integration is still quite extreme. It’s hard, takes… Read more »